Image source: Walk [Your City]

We scoured the web so you don’t have to. Here are some things this week that caught our eye…

DIY Wayfinding Signs Are About to Go Mainstream

Former graduate student Matt Tomasulo began a project in Raleigh that debuted in 2012 drawing much attention for his self created signs which guided and informed citizens of Raleigh which direction and how long it would take to get to a certain destination, often noted in minutes by foot or by bike.  Now, after a Kickstarter campaign and funding from the Knight Foundation, Tomasulo’s “WalkRaleigh” project is expanding in a big way.

Check out the story and see how the new “Walk [Your City]” project allows users to create signs aimed at guiding others to destinations within their city.  Signs are color coded for their type – Commercial, Public Space, Civic/Institutional , and Amusement.

The Neighborhood Has Gentrified, But Where’s the Grocery Store?

Image from GOVERNING article,
credit: Shutterstock

Part of a series by GOVERNING regarding gentrification, this article covers the issue of the changing landscape and revitalization of America’s downtowns, such as Cleveland, which still noticeably lack grocery options.

Urban Regeneration: What recent research says about best practices

The mid-19th Century brought declining population and disinvestment in the core areas of major American cities, many in the Rustbelt, and coincided with state and federal policies that effectively encouraged suburbinization. This post provides key findings and many potential strategies to address disinvestment and spur regeneration.

Why Are Developers Still Building Sprawl?

Image from The Atlantic article, credit: Don Graham/Flickr

The Atlantic points out that while data and feedback supports that Boomers and Millennials alike want to live in compact, walkable developments builders still are investing in sprawling suburban communities complete with even larger McMansions than before.